The test of an adventure is that when you are in the middle of it, you say to yourself, "Oh, now I've got myself into an awful mess; I wish I were sitting quietly at home." And the sign that something is wrong with you is when you sit quietly at home wishing you were out having lots of adventure. -Thornton Wilder

The nice thing about being confused is you get a chance to notice things a lot better than if you knew where you were going.

Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.

Friday, January 7, 2011

The Battle Continues

Ash-Throated Flycatcher

I went for a hike in a different park thinking different animals and birds were to be found. Not so, as other than the usual chattering Acorn Woodpeckers this Flycatcher was the only other resident to be found. Everyone's left for the winter. I think I'll stick to my Annadel Park for close-by-home places to stalk wildlife. This picture isn't the greatest but it is all I have for my efforts. Things will get better...I hope.

But the battle between my camera and I continues. I've been working with a 400mm lens lately trying to get the hang of it now, rather than later when I have that prize-winning photo opportunity in front of me. I was well into my hike when I raised the camera for that first shot and nothing clicked. Looking at the screen on top an error code was flashing at me. I didn't know what eFF mean't. I fiddled with the camera and lens for the longest time before I finally gave up and called home for help. I had to get my wife to look it up in the owner's manual. Turned out the aperture ring had to be set at its smallest setting of f22 for things to work! Grrrrr....

I wasn't going to write about this as I do have a wee bit of pride in me, but I've had 48 hours now to get over the humiliation. Stay tuned for further misadventures of Me and My Camera. I could create a whole other blog on that subject.

6 comments:

  1. the new camera/lens thing is a huge learning process. I was looking at pictures of when I just got my 500 (and at the time, I had a Canon Rebel) mm and wow...it really just takes time. Do you have a filter on the lens? I don't recommend them. A lot of it is about patience (which I don't always have much of). Bird photography is especially hard. I mean, they're so small and rarely do they sit still long enough to get 'em in the frame- makes ya crazy sometimes! I had that same(similar at least) error come up on my rebel a few times and I think I may have cried cause i couldn't figure it out. I've had the camera do mean things at very inopportune times :)

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  2. Maybe you should carry your camera manual with you, so you can sit for a spell and read some. Glad that you figured it all out.

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  3. Johnny Nutcase - I was wondering about the filter on that lens and planned to do some test shots in the backyard without it on, plus at different settings. Thanks for revealing that even the best have had frustrating issues with their equipment. I feel better already.

    Janie2 - sorry but I'm lugging enough gear already on the trails. I don't need any owner's manuals the size of a small telephone book to carry along too. I can't take credit for figuring it out. My darling wife is the one who rescued me.

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  4. Oh we've all had them, no shame, it means you're learning!

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  5. Phainopepla (not ash-throated flycathcher). This must be a fairly worthy sighting for this time of year - they are usually spring/summer visitors (Neo-tropical migrants). COOL SIGHTING!!!

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  6. That is such a wonderful find.

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