A Traveler and his Cat exploring America.





Tuesday, August 16, 2011

The Spider and the Fly

I was unable to decide as to what is more interesting. The spider..

...or the light on the web...

...or the entire scene itself.

After taking a few shots I wondered if somehow I could get closer. This meant stepping down the slope, through a tangle of thorny berry vines interlaced with poison oak. I then looked back up at the web and a bee-fly had just became intangled. The spider was moving in for the kill. There was no question now, I went for it. By the time I had my footing somewhat stable, I looked back to the web just in time to see the bee-fly break free from the web, saving itself and the spider retreating to safe hiding beneath the leaves to sulk about a missed out meal. Drama missed. I undid myself from the brier patch and continued on my way. Poison oak doesn't bother me as I seem to have some sort of immunity to it.

10 comments:

  1. the things we'll do for a shot... :)

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  2. I like the light on the web with the spider waiting for its prey..
    Awesome captures!

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  3. Great shot of the web! It shows up wonderfully in this light. I hope you always have an immunity to poison oak!

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  4. Spider webs are fascinating. I especially like that last shot. You're lucky that poison oak doesn't bother you. I get a rash if I even walk near the stuff.

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  5. Love your great shots of the spider and the web.

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  6. Glad you didn't fall INTO it's web! Gorgeous shot!
    And jealous of your immunity to poison oak!

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  7. These web builders amaze me.

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  8. The web is so sharp, cool shot! ;-)

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  9. this is so intriguing. spider webs are beautiful but I can't help myself from trying to free whatever is caught in them when I see it entangled. it's like putting a mouse in with a snake and then the poor thing has to live in that space, waiting for that moment when the snake decides it's time. just don't like it. as long as I don't have to see it, all is well. and you're lucky to have an immunity to poison oak. a few years back I mowed over a patch of poison ivy on the edge of my lawn (when I had my farm) and the oil got sprayed all over my legs. I had three-inch thick blisters over 75% of my legs. there were some days when I was wishing I had just been killed by it.

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  10. Fascinating! I miss my Louisville cottage garden and the many large, garden spiders that wove webs all about it. They spooked lot of people but I love it when they were visiting during the annual garden tour.

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