A Traveler and his Cat exploring America.





Friday, December 9, 2011

A Lot of Rocks


There are quite a few wineries in our area that have chosen to use rock for their fencing.
No mortar is used in the construction.


Below you can see how thick the fence is so imagine how much more rock it takes to build one.


This fence was easier to build I suspect for it being on flat ground. I have seen stone fence follow the contours of the land up and down hills.

Although this winery did not have any, I have seen signs saying there is a fine for removing the rocks.
Now why would anyone want one of these rocks?


For more fences check out Jan's

17 comments:

  1. We used to have a house that had a similar stone fencing around .. no mortar ... amazing!

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  2. Every time I see a stone fencing it reminds me of the British countryside.
    Have a good weekend John and Sinbad! ;-)

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  3. This is so cool...I can just imagine how long it took to build!

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  4. no mortar? wow! that's completely impressive! i wish we had stone fences here, but first the ground is too unstable, and second, there's just not enough rock material to build with!

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  5. I admire these rock fences without mortar, all the more because I can still vividly remember helping my mother build just such a wall in our yard when I was 12! It was hard work! :-)

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  6. That is a lot of hard work!! Wonderful photos~

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  7. Roks are easy to find there, I guess. It take a lot of time to build this kind of wall, though.

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  8. ...that must've been syncronicity happening! Rock-walls/fences; I love them. See a lot on Escape to the Country (UK), one of my favourite tv shows to admire the landscapes from afar. One of our birding friends has a video on his blog with a segment the beavers shifting these things with such ease; it amazed me. Lovely post; great photos!

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  9. It's pleasing to know that there continue to be folks who have the skills to do this kind of work. Very impressive. And probably really expensive.

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  10. This is beautiful. I can just imagine kids taking the rocks just for the fun of it.

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  11. Wow, that looks like a lot work. Someone knew what they were doing. I've never seen a fence like this up close and personal. Nice photography.

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  12. Wonderful to see your images.

    Dry stone walls are amazing structures John... used over here to create fields for sheep and cattle... there over are 7000 miles of them...about 200 years old and still standing.

    Emailed you an example..

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  13. This reminds me of my many rides through England. Impressive. I would not dare think of removing one of them. Don’t want to be called a criminal...just an old lady. genie

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  14. I see a lot of stone fences like this in the central part of our state. that was the area covered by the glacier, whereas I grew up in and have lived most of the time in the "driftless" area (the glacier didn't reach that far south/west). the glacier left all those rocks and they had to be picked up before the fields could be cultivated. the fences have steadily gotten higher through the years! but it isn't an easy task rock-picking like that, and no matter how many are picked up, they still appear all the time.
    I think the fences are beautiful. were these fences made from found rock, like in this state? I'm wondering. it seems it would take an awful lot of rock if they're trucked in. at any rate I'm glad you photographed them to share. you live in a beautiful state.

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  15. How perfectly marvelous. I watched a program on how to build a fence like this--that is a LOT of work. And what a spectacular photo.

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  16. Not quite a 'Drystane Dyke' John,but points for effort.They reckon some of our drystone walls here in Scotland date back to the 14th century.

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  17. I so love these rock fences!!! And I am specially fond of the second shot.

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