A Traveler and his Cat exploring America.





Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Turkey Hunting

I see wild turkeys all the time when up in Annadel State Park.  I thought I would try to get some real nice turkey photos for my Thanksgiving Day post.  Ya think I could find any?  Huh?  None at all.  I tromped around in the woods for miles...nothing but a few stray feathers.  
My wife says they are all hiding because of the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday.

So feeling pretty bummed with nothing in my camera for the effort, I remembered a quote from a wildlife photography program I watch on PBS every once in awhile "It's not just the photograph, it is the outdoor experience".  I looked around and thought Yes, this is nice.  How fortunate I am to be free to wander around in the woods exploring as I did today  then took a few pictures of the colors across the meadow.


Last week I did a post on the unfortunate victims in nature, Forest Crime Scenes.  On this day I came across a dead skunk.  Now what forest predator in his right mind would take on and kill a skunk?  He would have to be quite desperate I'd think.  This is the business end of the skunk that is left.  You can see the forward portion of the spinal column with head still attached, although turned around in relation to the body.  I didn't mess with it.  It kind of stunk.

I found this 5 inch long feather.  I cannot think of a bird in our area with orange in it's feathers.



13 comments:

  1. I think your wife is right John; what right-thinking turkey would lay themselves out on the line for a pot-shot this time of year? Oh YES, you know I think the autumn colours is more magical than a turkey for todays post anyway. Is the feather from a parrot do you think?

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  2. I would be deep in the bushes if I was a turkey!

    Cant help on the tail feather. I remember driving past a skunk road-kill once - it was not a good experience!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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  3. It is a wonderful area to explore there, you always find something interesting on the "killing fields" and the feather is very mysterious too, from "Winnetou"?

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  4. Methinks the turkeys have heard bout hunting season, John! I'm glad you didn't mess with the skunk! The foliage is lovely so worth a reip into the woods.

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  5. Ben Franklin wanted the Truley to be the National Bird of the USA.

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  6. my dogs would be silly enough to kill that skunk - and carry the aroma around for weeks thereafter. then our vultures would come clean up the rest and leave what you found. :)

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  7. I suppose everything has to go some point in time. What kind of feather is it, a turkey feather? I haven't the faintest clue. But, it sure is pretty and I hope that was natural shedding.

    Paz :)

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  8. Your fall colors are beautiful John.

    Poor skunk. They get a bad rap. I know they stink but they are still cute.

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  9. I read all the comments hoping someone would tell what the feather was from...if you ever find out, post the shot again with the answer. Though I will probably come back and check for a few days to come to see if anyone new has commented.

    Otherwise, that fall color is beautiful.

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  10. I'm back...went and googled orange and black bird...then clicked on 'images' when the results came up...the only thing I seen that I thought was even close was the American Redstart...and in most of the images, the oranges feathers sure don't look this orange...though I did eventually come across one that was at least close. But they are not supposed to be in California...

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  11. You took some amazing shots of your woodlands John... stunning colours.

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  12. The feather belonged to a Northern Flicker. Beautiful woodland colors too!

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