The test of an adventure is that when you are in the middle of it, you say to yourself, "Oh, now I've got myself into an awful mess; I wish I were sitting quietly at home." And the sign that something is wrong with you is when you sit quietly at home wishing you were out having lots of adventure. -Thornton Wilder

The nice thing about being confused is you get a chance to notice things a lot better than if you knew where you were going.

Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.

Monday, February 3, 2014

The 1500's pt.4



   Those with money had plates made of pewter.  Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach out onto the food, causing lead poisoning and death.  This happened most often with tomatoes so for the next 400 years or so tomatoes were considered poisonous.  (I always wondered why this was)
   Most people did not have pewter plates but had trenchers, a piece of wood with the middle scooped out like a bowl.  Trenchers were never washed and a lot of the time worms got into the wood.  After eating off wormy trenchers one would get "trench mouth".


   Bread was divided according to status.  Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the "upper crust".

We'll end this series tomorrow





11 comments:

  1. Nice stuff John. I like it very much.

    ReplyDelete
  2. And many people still seem to think that tomatoes are still toxic!

    What you don't know about the Pelican picture is that there is a person waving a fish just below the horizon!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

    ReplyDelete
  3. I like those stories of the past to read.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Where are you getting this info from, John? A book?

    Jo, who bakes her own bread and gets any part she wants!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Yep and it is also said to have come from WW 1 when the soldier's in the trenches developed the disease because of poor hygiene.

    Interesting stuff

    ReplyDelete
  6. I wonder who got brave enough to start eating tomatoes!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Mmmmm, trench worms. Almost as good as porcini worms. :)

    http://historymedren.about.com/od/dailylifesociety/a/bod_trench.htm

    ReplyDelete

I appreciate my commenters. Thank you. Sometimes you may ask a question which I am all too happy to answer. But if your comment comes in as Betsy-noreply-comment - I cannot reply back. Change you comment settings to include an e-mail address and then bloggers can reply.