A Traveler and his Cat exploring America.





Thursday, May 22, 2014

The First Fence


Jamestown, Virginia

In 1607 English colonists established the first permanent English settlement in the New World on what was to be called the James River which flows into Chesapeake Bay.  Captain John Smith wrote "A verie fit place for the erecting of a greate cittie".  Jamestown never became a great city and was eventually abandoned for better townsites elsewhere before the century ended.  Through historical research and archaeological diggings some portions of Jamestown have been reconstructed to exact details and placements as they existed 400 years ago.  This fence in one example.

The fence was laid out the shape of a triangle which became Jamestown Fort, a necessity the colonists felt for protection from the neighboring Indians.  Good fences make for good neighbors remember.


 It was long thought that the Jamestown Fort had been overtaken by the James River many years ago.  It wasn't until as late as 1994 and since that they've discovered that all except one small corner the triangular shaped fort is still on dry land.

 An inside of the fort view of the fence.  When you don't have nails, you make-do.
Pretty ingenious I say. 

For more fences visit Good Fences

23 comments:

  1. Great construction details here. It looks also a bit on the boat building skills from that time how to fit a wooden skin on the rafters by means of wooden pegs.The concept of a fence must be unheard of by the indians of that time I think. Thanks for showing John.

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  2. That must have been a lot of work to make the fence. The arrows of the Indians could have easily come over this I think...

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  3. This is a great fence. I love the history here. Thanks for sharing it!

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  4. that's got some history and some stories to tell! pretty neat fence!

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  5. That's a good fence for sure! As much as I enjoy history and visiting historical places, I wouldn't have liked living back then.

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  6. What a great fence. I'd like to visit Jamestown someday. So much history, and yet we're such a young country.

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  7. The construction of this fence is indeed fascinating!

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  8. Intersting post and pictures!
    So they had in Germany earlier worked too: made nails from wood.

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  9. Great photos and information.

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  10. Fascinating post this one on the "first fence" in the New World. Thank you for sharing so many details.

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  11. An interesting piece of fence construction which is unlike anything I've seen before. The "wooden nails" technique was standard practice back then and you can still find examples of barn and house frames held together like that. I'll look out for some for you!

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  12. Cool fence, amazing that it's still standing.

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  13. These are great captures John. Interesting history too.

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  14. This is one of the most interesting fences I have ever seen.

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  15. Wow...I am in total awe of this post!!! Seriously.

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  16. Necessity is the mother of invention!

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  17. Nice shots and I really enjoyed the history lesson.

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  18. A wonderful post to read John... I share your history posts with the guys at work.

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  19. Wow that is really cool and it was interesting to read about this very OLD fence. I like the wooden pegs inside the fence.

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  20. This is a one-of-a-kind fence - very inspiring. I love it.

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