The test of an adventure is that when you are in the middle of it, you say to yourself, "Oh, now I've got myself into an awful mess; I wish I were sitting quietly at home." And the sign that something is wrong with you is when you sit quietly at home wishing you were out having lots of adventure. -Thornton Wilder

The nice thing about being confused is you get a chance to notice things a lot better than if you knew where you were going.

Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Abraham Lincoln's Tomb


Springfield, Illinois

I stopped to see this as it was close to the path we were taking through Illinois.

As I said on post at the time from the road, it was creepy inside.  Real quiet, cold (a sign informed me to remove my hat) and with voices kept low.  I could still hear words echo through the halls.  It was like being in a mausoleum.  Wait, I was in a mausoleum wasn't I?

 In trying to avoid a busload that followed me inside I went to the right when they went the opposite way which means I probably saw it all backwards, but I don't think it mattered.

Ooo...that's a long way to walk by myself, alone.  
Gee I hope no wall shuts down behind me and traps me in here.

Notice Abe's left shoe.  People, keep your hands in your pockets!  Oh it gets worse later.


Okay, that sign doesn't say it all.  Abe is inside a lead lined cedar wood coffin, inside a metal steel cage, inside a cement chamber,  deep in the ground ten feet down.  Poor old Abe's coffin has been moved 17 times and opened 6 times over the years.  Not any more I bet.

Abe's family except for son Robert are in the wall facing Abe.

Okay, I just want out of here. Which way Abe?

I hope this is the way.

Tomorrow we'll see outside where Abe was before this place.


12 comments:

  1. Nice post.

    I often think there is a contradiction in needed to celebrate the life of an influential person by informing silence, rather than conversation and thought.

    Cheers - Stewart M - Melbourne

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  2. Unbelievable but I have also seen this tomb from inside and outside on my way to the Dana Thomas House of Frank Lloyd Wright in Springfield. Nice reminder John.

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  3. As usual SC has had his comment first, but this is such a surprise to see. Old memories from 2007 came up when we were in Springfield too. I had almost forgotten we had visited the tomb, but when seeing your photo's we both remembered we had been there. We were there for a short time on our roadtrip to visit other places.

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  4. Lincoln was one of my favorite US Presidents ever. the area in the beginning of Sept. we did not see that sight. thank you for sharing ... i did wonder what it would be like? moved 17 times. poor man ... that is a lot of moving??!

    we went to the Lincoln's New Salem Historic Site. lots of rain when we were there. ( :

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  5. The Tomb really is a grand looking place. It seems to be in the middle of nowhere with few people visiting it.

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  6. No wonder you were a bit nervous!

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  7. Wow, that's all I can say. Impressive.

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  8. Being raised about an hour north of Springfield, we made many class trips to Springfield to Lincoln's Tomb and Lincoln's home. However, much later the Lincoln Library and Museum was built, and it is a fabulous place to visit. Don't miss it. The electronic presentation of the Civil War is awesome.

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  9. apparently r.i.p. didn't really apply to abraham.

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  10. I found that place a bit creepy too. There are some nicer things to see in Springfield and nearby.

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  11. Ancestor worship, practised by people in Madagascar, and the reverence with which the North Koreans view their politicians always seem alien concepts. But maybe not so different after all.

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