The test of an adventure is that when you are in the middle of it, you say to yourself, "Oh, now I've got myself into an awful mess; I wish I were sitting quietly at home." And the sign that something is wrong with you is when you sit quietly at home wishing you were out having lots of adventure. -Thornton Wilder

The nice thing about being confused is you get a chance to notice things a lot better than if you knew where you were going.

Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.

Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Haul it in


I mentioned a couple posts ago as to how expensive everything must have been for it all had to be brought it from far away over rough roads.  There are two roads into where Bodie lies, the main one being 13 miles long coming off of California Highway 395.  Another off of Highway 120 than runs along Mono Lake is longer.  Back in the day, the late 1870's, these roads were all rough-cut dirt and gravel made for horse or mule drawn wagons.  In time automobiles came on to the scene and the roads were improved...some.  Today that 13-mile road is paved except for the last few miles.

Rest assured, the improved road back then never looked this good.

By 1879, 5000 to 7000 people lived in Bodie just as the gold boom began to die.
So imagine hauling in food, supplies, building and mining materials, and of course fuel.
 Keep in mind Sacramento and San Francisco was a couple hundred miles to the west
 on the other side of the High Sierra mountains.

By 1910, 698 residents stayed on in Bodie rather than to move on to other mining opportunities.
Ten years later the population dwindled down to 120 hearty souls.
I wonder how much per gallon gasoline must have cost back then over normal prices.



10 comments:

  1. In the goldrush days there must be made a lot of money to justify all those hardships and endurance. What a stories can be told here.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That first photo gives a good impression how it must have looked like in the old days. The hauling in of all the products must have been quite a challenge indeed. Pretty interesting to see that ghosttown where so many things are still visible.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I can't imagine living in such an isolated place!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very nice. Love that the pumps are preserved, and that sign, too.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I'm always amazed at remote locations like this and thinking about the hardships of life and difficulties of getting supplies in.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It's interesting to imagine what life must have been like! The promise of possibly finding gold must have been over-powering!

    ReplyDelete
  7. The pumps are awesome- I'm surprised they have survived.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Love those pumps, we were just talking the other day about the cost of goods in Newfoundland, same problem with everything having to be shipped in from the mainland raises the prices.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Those pumps would make the American Pickers salivate.

    ReplyDelete

I appreciate my commenters. Thank you. Sometimes you may ask a question which I am all too happy to answer. But if your comment comes in as Betsy-noreply-comment - I cannot reply back. Change you comment settings to include an e-mail address and then bloggers can reply.