A Traveler and his Cat exploring America.





Friday, July 21, 2017

Moldy Trees?


Tree Mold Trail

Okay, when I first read this in the brochure that's what I thought.  Once
there at the trail head I had an "oh I see" moment.  This was a long one
mile hike in.  Yeah, one mile isnt that far but it was mid-day, getting
hot and through a lava field.  But I was glad I went to see the tree molds.

When the lava flowed it passed through a forest of trees.  One tree
remained standing and left a perfect round core in the lava.





A few others fell and left their impressions where you can still see the
distinctive pattern in the bark.  There are probably many more impressions
buried beneath the surface of the lava.




Looks like tire tracks from 2000 years ago.  Hmm...

Craters of the Moon had the most descriptive trail signs I had ever seen.



2 comments:

  1. Those trail signs are certainly comprehensive. I worked for several years as a "walks guide" leading groups of holiday-makers on mountain trails, most of which were much rougher than your signs indicate. One evening I was chatting to some other leaders who worked for the same company about group safety. After a lot of anecdotes we decided to do a little semi-scientific investigation into where accidents occurred on our walks. This was not too difficult as we were required to fill in a form for any incidents which involved any First Aid. Guess what, most of them happened not on the rough trails which we spent much of our time on, but on minor roads, paved tracks and even in car parks. Partly this was due to icy winter conditions which made such surfaces very slippery, but also I think because people tended to relax and take less care when there was little perceived danger. On the trails themselves there was a tendency for accidents to take place on the first stages of descent from a mountain-top or viewpoint, again probably because everyone was concentrating that little bit less. All of which makes the usefulness of knowing the typical trail width rather questionable.

    ReplyDelete
  2. No Beans allowed on the trails...:)

    ReplyDelete

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